Redskins OFFENSE vs The Lions

Formations & Depth Chart

Versus our 11 personnel, Detroit went with their Nickel:

11vsnickel

When we went heavy, the Lions usually responded with a 4-4 look that had Cover 3 behind it:

13vs44

Detroit sometimes messed around with their DL alignments.  Here they have 3 defensive lineman aligned from the left guard to outside the left tackle and the safety is stacked behind them:

tripsdl

In the chart, I called that one, “Nickel Trips DL”

Depth Chart:

  • RT: Moses (73)
  • RG: Scherff (58), backed up by Kouj (15)
  • C: Long (73)
  • LG: Lauvao (73)
  • LT: Williams (72)
  • TE: Davis (71), Paul (12), Nsekhe (11)
  • FB: Paul (7), Kelley (2)
  • RB: Thompson (43), Jones (22), Kelley (8)
  • WR: Garcon (57), DeSean (54), Crowder (55), backed up by Grant (20) and Mo Harris (4)

Rob Kelley got both his Fullback snaps at the goal line.  Scherff missed 15 snaps with an injury and was backed up by Kouj.  Nsekhe is really a 6th offensive lineman, but he’s eligible for a catch when he checks in so I’m classifying him here as a tight end.

The Show

First Drive:

The biggest theme from the 1st drive was missed opportunities.  It started on the third play of the first drive, where we ran Counter on 3rd and 1.  Lauvao and Scherff will eliminate 2 guys each–something that rarely happens at this level–and Niles Paul is left to dig out the most immediate threat as he pulls through the line:

counterpaulmissedblock1

As Paul pulls through he doesn’t see his target coming from the left:

counterpaulmissedblock2

If he did, Matt Jones is one on one with a safety and has a chance to flip field position and/or put us in field goal range.  Instead Paul got blind sided:

We end up getting the first but were so close to getting much more.

[AFTER THE JUMP:  The ‘9-6’ route, Grades, Cliff Notes, and a link to the Chart]

Continue reading Redskins OFFENSE vs The Lions

Redskins DEFENSE vs The Lions

Formations & Depth Chart

We were in a 3-4 defense for about a quarter of the snaps throughout the game, otherwise we were mostly in Nickel with the line shifted toward the tight end:

nickelover

In passing situations we lifted Foster for Cravens or Garvin.  Cravens is seen here in our “Okie” front.  Okie means all the lineman and linebackers are standing at the line pre-snap:

nickelokie

A few times, we replaced a safety for a 4th cornerback (line is ‘split’ for a better pass rush):

nickelsplit4cb

Depth Chart – Nickel (out of 53 snaps):

  • DE:  Kerrigan (40) and Smith (38), backed up by Murphy (31)
  • DT:  Hood (44) and Baker (43), backed up by Francois (16), Jenkins (10) and Ioannidis (4)
  • ILB:  Compton (53), Foster (40)
  • Cravensbacker:  Cravens (11), Garvin (3)
  • Strong Safety:  Whitner (44) backed up by Nacho (9)
  • Free Safety:  Blackmon (39) backed up by Whitner (9)
  • CB:  Breeland (49) and Norman (28), backed up by Dunbar (27) and Toler (5)
  • Slot/Nickel CB:  Fuller (40)

‘Cravensbacker’ is the hybrid Linebacker/Safety position we play in place of Foster in passing situations.  With the 3-4 defense, Fuller gets lifted for an extra defensive lineman which was usually Francois.  Compton and Whitner were the only guys to play all 53 snaps.

The Show

Against the Giants we faced guards pulling from side to side which created moving gaps that our second level backers struggled to defend.  This time around the Lions tested us not with pulling guards but with pulling H-Backs (red path).  The tight end lined up in front of Murphy (red X) is running a route, just pretend he’s not even in the picture:

splitzoneWe responded to the pulling H-Back by bumping down a Safety and the front 8 gap coverage went like so:

  • Whitner replaces Compton’s gap, so
  • Compton can replace Foster’s gap, so
  • Foster can replace Murphy’s gap, so
  • Murphy can play contain on the extra gap added to his side by the pulling H-Back.

All gaps are accounted for.  Ioannidis comes off his block to make initial contact with the back and Whitner is in position for the fill:

[AFTER THE JUMP:  The Last Play, A Link to the Chart, Grades, Safeties, Safeties WTF!]

Continue reading Redskins DEFENSE vs The Lions

Redskins Offense vs The Eagles (I)

Formations

When we sent out more than 1 tight end, the Eagles responded with a 4-3 and usually inserted a Safety into the box:

12personnela

In an effort to get the ball out on the perimeter we positioned a Bunch/Triangle set tight to the line:

bunch

The Bunch (top of the screen) afforded us quick throws outside and also allowed us to crack down on edge defenders and pull lineman out wide to get them matched up on defensive backs.

Continue reading Redskins Offense vs The Eagles (I)

FFODC Calls It Cravensbacker

Welcome Mbu:  There was some chatter about Pot Roast, Phil Taylor and 3 other defensive lineman being brought in for workouts to replace the departed Kendall Reyes.  This blog’s opinion: ABPR, Anyone But Pot Roast.  If you read the breakdowns last year you already know why.

It was a little confusing as to why we were going to waste a roster spot on a washed up veteran when Ioannidis was grading out neutral as a backup nose tackle.  He’s willing to play a position Baker doesn’t want too and he’s not a liability when inserted into the line up.  Sounds like an upgrade over the other option.  Thankfully no extra fat was added to the roster and instead we signed former Falcon Joey Mbu to the practice squad:

That username though.  Someone actually has a scouting report on him:

According to Pro Football Focus he played 55 of 133 possible snaps over those two games earning a slightly below average grade of -1.6. He played as well as you would expect an undrafted rookie to play. Mbu played the run decently while offering no pass rush. He posted four tackles over those 55 snaps.

So a 6’3 311 pound run stopper with an arm length of 35 inches–almost 2 full inches longer than Reyes.  He fits the mold of a 5 technique meaning, if activated to the main roster, he could back up Francois and moonlight at the other 2 interior positions (nose and 3 tech.)

Continue reading FFODC Calls It Cravensbacker

Redskins Defense Vs The Eagles (I)

Formations:

The Eagles opened up with 13 (1RB, 3 TE) personnel:

nickelvs13

and, for the first time I think ever, we responded with a Nickel defense.  Normally we come out in a 3-4 if there is more than 1 tight end or a fullback is in the game.  This matchup got us a sack as Kerrigan matched up one on one with the tight end closest to the center.

Otherwise it was mainly our Nickel vs their 11 and our 3-4 vs their 12 and 13.  On 3rd and longs we gave a few exotic looks.  A couple of times we went 3(DL)-3(LB)-5(DB):

335

and a couple of times we showed a 3-2-6, the 3 lineman in this play–which resulted in a sack–were Kerrigan, Murphy and Smith:

326

On 3rd and 5 we pulled Compton off the field and went into a Dime package (4-1-6) with Terence Garvin at linebacker:

dimegarvin

We also had a few plays where we lifted the slot corner off the field in favor of a 3rd safety.

Depth Chart for our Nickel:

  • DE:  Kerrigan and Smith with Murphy off the bench.
  • DT (Nose and 3Tech):  Baker, Hood, with Francois and Ioannidis off the bench
  • ILB:  Foster, Compton with Garvin on some 3rd downs
  • CB:  Norman the whole way.  Breeland shared time with Dunbar on the first drive.  Dunbar had a hard time getting lined up with Whitner on one play and I don’t think we saw much of him after that.
  • Slot CB:  Fuller, sometimes replaced by a 3rd safety.
  • Strong Safety:  Nacho with Whitner off the bench
  • Free Safety:  Blackmon with Whitner off the bench.

In the 3-4, where we replace the slot corner with a 5th defensive lineman, Francois got the start.  I’m going off of memory so if I missed a guy let me know in the comments.  Also you can like, comment in the comments.

The Show:

Where the disembodied head of EA Sports’ Kirk Herbstreit revolves around me and repeatedly chants “He just simply used POWER”:

The Power play reared it’s ugly head again.  In the preview I talked about how the Eagles like to fake like they are going to run Power and throw a bubble screen to the outside.  This time they switched it up and actually ran the Power play, because it’s us, so obviously you have to try.  Instead of passively reading blocks and getting run over, we attacked it with our play side linebacker (Foster in this case) and Safety.  Both guys will aim for the pulling guard and stop this play for a short gain:

power

Video:

Philly ran Power 3 times for 11 yards.  It’s become a non-factor which is something that seemed light years away from happening after the Giants’ game.  Having a safety willing to fill against the run has been the most important addition to this defense for the season.  On a Power play in the 4th quarter, Foster and Whitner did the same thing to the pulling guard, forcing Sproles to bounce outside into Smith and Breeland.

[After the jump:  All-22 video, Counter, Link to the Chart, Grades…and more words!!]

Continue reading Redskins Defense Vs The Eagles (I)

Redskins Offense Vs The Ravens

Formations

We lined up in our usual 11 and 12 personnel for most of the game, but we deployed the tight ends a little differently:

daviswide12

We sent Davis deep on this play and he had his guy–a 180 pound defensive back that ran a 4.46 40–beat.  When Davis wasn’t out wide we tucked him inside in our heavier packages:

13formation

When multiple tight ends are lined up like above, Davis will always be tucked furthest inside.  He has a bigger body built to take on bigger guys like outside linebackers and defensive ends.  Reed will occasionally take on bigger guys but we position him to normally see linebackers and defensive backs.

Niles Paul, our third tight end, is the only one we moonlight at fullback:

21formation

Our Depth Chart for this game:

  • LT: Williams
  • LG: Lauvao
  • C: Long
  • RG: Scherff
  • RT: Moses (backed up by Nsekhe, who came in on drives 6 through 10.)
  • TE: Reed (Davis is second off the bench, Paul is third)
  • FB: Paul

Matt Jones was backed up by Robert Kelley and Chris Thompson.  Garcon and Jackson were the outside guys, Crowder was our starter in the slot.  Rashad Ross backed up the outside guys, Ryan Grant backed up Crowder.

The Show

Continue reading Redskins Offense Vs The Ravens

Redskins Defense Vs The Ravens

Formations

(Note:  Cliff Notes are at the end, along with the Chart)

We stayed in a 3-4 for the majority of the game.  Blackmon and Nacho were the safeties with Blackmon lining up to the side with more wide receivers:

3-4

and Nacho lining up to the side with more tight ends:

3-4b

We occasionally lined up with new lines on passing downs, this line consisted of Smith-Murphy-Garvin(linebacker, standing up) and Kerrigan:

nascar

Norman and Dunbar were the starters at corner with Toler backing both of them up.  Fuller was our Nickel/Slot cornerback.  Whitner was our “Dime” defensive back, he came in on passing downs to cover tight ends.  Garvin (52) played the role of Su’a Cravens as the linebacker who replaced Foster on passing downs.

The Show

Baltimore spent most of the first drive running it away from our Safety in the box (Blackmon/Nacho) and towards Dunbar’s gap.  Our defensive end had contain while Dunbar had to cover gaps inside:

dunbar1

Dunbar gets to handle an Iso block from the fullback and is out of his element:

They tried to attack Dunbar’s gap again in the 3rd quarter, again the defensive end has contain while Dunbar is playing the gap denoted by the yellow line:

dunbar2

But we adjusted by slanting the line towards the gap:

Continue reading Redskins Defense Vs The Ravens

FFODC Joins Oakland

PFF’s Future #1 LB: Week 3 saw former Redskin and current Raider David Amerson stand atop PFF’s best individual performance rankings.  Yesterday, former Redskin Perry Riley–who just signed Tuesday–stood atop the Raiders’ defensive PFF rankings.  Okay then.  Apparently head coach Jack Del Rio wanted Riley for a while:

I remember Riley blanketing wheel routes out of the backfield and even picking one off versus the Saints.  His speed was unquestioned but his vision was another story.  He had a tendency to lose gap control and gave up chunks of yards.  Maybe former linebacker Jack Del Rio is just the mentor he needs.

Hitner:  Speaking of discarded players finding a new home, Donte Whitner claimed he will be playing with a chip on his shoulder.  I still have to chart the last drive, but so far his role consists of coming in on Dime formations and lining up over the tight end in one-on-one coverage (similar to what DHall occasionally did.)  The article also talks about Garcon adding power to his route running.  Good timing on that write up as Garcon had a day: 5 catches for 56 yards and a touchdown.  His best game since Pittsburgh in week 1.

Finish Strong:  The defense has been lights out in the 2nd half:

In fact, in the past three weeks, the Redskins’ defense has allowed just nine second-half points. In one sequence Sunday, they forced four straight three-and-outs

they held Baltimore to 3 of 15 on 3rd downs (20%) and forced 8 punts.  Steve Smith leaving the game helped out matters, but that is still a huge step up from being the NFL’s worst 3rd down defense.  Side note:  Crockett Gillmore is strong af and gave Kerrigan and Smith all they could handle with his kick out blocking.  Side note #2: also strong, Trent Murphy.

How do they get these up so quick:  PFF had grades for the game posted by 7pm, which…damn.  Francois got the 3rd highest grade for the defense as he continues to have his best games versus zone running teams.  Foster and Fuller top the list with an 88.8 grade.  Foster did shut down a couple of flat routes and was more aggressive versus the run thanks to predictable play calling from a hamstrung offense.  Both Compton and Foster had a few plays diagnosed pre-snap, more about that will be posted tomorrow.

Elsewhere:  Brian Mitchell interviews Jamison Crowder.  Hogs Haven recaps the game.